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Critical Mass Research Poster Awardees

Each year Critical Mass:YA Cancer Alliance, holds an important conference bringing together stakeholders in the field of YA Cancer. Researchers, doctors, nurses, non-profit administrators, survivors and caregivers come together to learn from each other. This year the conference was held in Chicago.

As a Critical Mass partner, and strong advocate for YA Cancer Research, our foundation annually awards researchers in two categories: Innovative Research and Clinical Trials and Innovative Programs and Services. The top three research posters are selected within each category and given a cash award.

We strongly believe that good research is an important step towards finding the best way to cure and treat cancer. FIGHT CONQUER CURE!!

Below are the names of the individuals awarded at the Critical Mass Conference 2015.

Innovative Research                                    Innovative Programs

First Place $500        DEBORAH MOROSINI,MD                       MEGAN BIANCHETTI, MSW

Second Place $300    THERESA KEEGAN, PH.D                         KATHLEEN VILLA, PH.D

Third Place $150        JEANNE ERICKSON, PH.D                       MARIA CABLE, RN

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MARIA CABLE RN Title: “Just In Case”: the Fertility information needs of teenagers and young adults with cancer.

 

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MEGAN BIANCHETTI, MSW Title: Distress in AYAs with Cancer: Components and Covariates

 

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THERESA KEEGAN, PH.D Title: Sociodemographic disparities in survival for adolescents and young adults with cancer differ by health insurance status: a population based-study in California, 2001-2011

 

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JAMES L. BAKER PHARM.D (for Kathleen Villa) Title: A Modeling Analysis of the Risks and Benefits of a Pediatric-Inspired Protocol Compared with a Hyper-CVAD Protocol in the Treatment of Adolescents and Young Adults with Philadelphia-Negative Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

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Jeanne Erickson, Ph.D. Title: The Pain Experience of Hospitalized Young Adults with Cancer

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MARK BAILEY PH.D. AND VINCENT MILLER MD (for Deborah Morosini) Title: Comprehensive genomic profiling of sarcomas from 203 adolescents and young adults reveals a distinct spectrum of targetable genomic alterations.

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PAT TAYLOR: Advocate, Parent, and Friend Organization: 3 LITTLE BIRDS 4 LIFE

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CHRISTABEL CHEUNG, MSW: Researcher and Survivor and new friend:) AND HER THERAPY DOG CALVIN.

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HERNAN BARANGAN: Movie Producer, Artist and Survivor (Check out his work on YouTube) Organization: TEEN CANCER AMERICA

EMILY’S RAINBOW RUN and Family Walk – April 19th

YOU ARE INVITED

TO

EMILY’S RAINBOW RUN and Family Walk

In honor of the Memory of our friend Emily Lewis 

The event will take place

Sunday, April 19th, 2015

Westlake High School

Westlake, Ohio 44145

4 MILE TIME RACE starts at 8 am

2 MILE RUN/WALK starts at 8:05 am

Kids Run starts approximately at 9:15 am

To register and for more information visit:

www.emilysrainbowfund.org

or

info@emilysrainbowfund.org

or download this flyer and registration form 2015_ERR_Registration

EmilyPhoto Emily8

New Cancer Publication Supported by SGAYA Cancer Fund

WE ARE PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE THAT RESEARCHERS IN HUANG LAB AT THE CASE MEDICAL SCHOOL HAVE PUBLISHED AN ARTICLE

TITLED

“FOCAL TRANSIENT CNS VESSEL LEAK PROVIDES A TISSUE NICHE FOR SEQUENTIAL IMMUNE CELL ACCUMULATION DURING THE ASYMPTOMATIC PHASE OF EAE INDUCTION.”

Purgert

Robert Purgert

Dr. Askew

Dr. David Askew

Two of our Scholarship recipients, Dr. David Askew and Robert Purgert, assisted in the research study and article development.

According to Dr. Alex Huang results of the study help researchers better understand…

1) how immune cells cross the blood-brain barrier during the development of autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis can be a knowledge base for improving anti-tumor immune cells to cross the same blood brain barrier when used to fight cancers in the brain.
And,
2) how immune cells (lymphocytes such as T cells and B cells) cross the blood brain barrier will also help us understand and prevent leukemia cells crossing the blood brain barrier from the blood to CNS metastasis.
And, of course, there is always the curiosity of how things actually work in this wonderful body that God gives to each of us!

Below please find the Bibliography details and the link ( Barkauskas Exp Neurol 2015 ) to the article.

Article title: Focal transient CNS vessel leak provides a tissue niche for sequential immune cell accumulation during the asymptomatic phase of EAE induction
Reference: YEXNR11938
Journal title: Experimental Neurology
Corresponding author: Dr. Alex Yee-Chen Huang
First author: Dr. Deborah S. Barkauskas
Final version published online: 28-FEB-2015
Full bibliographic details: Experimental Neurology  (2015), pp. 74-85
DOI information: 10.1016/j.expneurol.2015.02.018

 

fight conquer cure

Breast Cancer Research Fundraiser

breast cancerDid you know that Breast Cancer affects Young Adult Women? 

Did you know that Breast Cancer in Young Adult Women tends to more aggressive that in any other age group?

Did you know that there are more Young Adult Women being diagnosed with Breast Cancer than at another time in our history?

If you find these issues appalling, please consider supporting an important Fundraiser Event.

BREAST CANCER VACCINE RESEARCH FUNDRAISER

SPONSORED BY THE

DAUGHTERS OF PENELOPE 

ARE

HOSTING A FASHION SHOW AND LUNCHEON*

ON

MARCH 28TH, 2014

NOON

TICKETS: $35 (half is tax deductible)

Fashions by CaBi Clothing

Jewelry by Sabika

Makeup by Fields and Rodan

For more information and to purchase your ticket place telephone:

440-835-1913

*Event will take place at the

St. Demetrios Cultural Center

22909 Center Ridge Road

Rocky River, Ohio 44116

(please do not delay in making your reservation as seating is limited)

Attached please find the flyer:

flyer march 28

Cleveland: what a great place!

Hi folks,

As I sit here watching Neptune dump another 6 inches of snow, I remember a time when Steve was in the hospital during a mega February snow storm. Harry was supposed to stay the night and I was going home…however, the weather was so incredibly awful, I just decided to remain safe in Steve’s hospital room.  Harry and I shared a single bed next to Steven… It was a good decision as the weather was wicked!

Safety in the hospital…staying over night in the hospital…common phrases we hear everyday when we are impacted by a serious illness or a planned or unplanned surgery.

We are fortunate to have that “safe place” here in Cleveland.  We our blessed to have University Hospitals and the Cleveland Clinic.  It’s nice to be able to choose based on one’s needs.

Interestingly folks outside of Cleveland, particularly our friends on the East and West Coasts…aren’t aware of the medical facilities available to us Clevelanders’. I recall attending a conference where out of towners’ were AMAZED at the medical facilities and AYA CANCER SERVICES  …here in Cleveland…Wow!

So this is my plug for my hometown.

And also to say…thanks.

Last but not least…we continue to deliver BE CALM STAY STRONG PACKAGES for YA Cancer Patients. Feel free to email me at angie@fightconquercure.com to learn how you can support this important service.

Below you will see a photo of Erin Gibson, Pediatric Oncology Social Worker at the Cleveland Clinic’s Children’s Hospital, and me…with ten BE CALM STAY STRONG PACKAGES  for Ya Cancer patients and two bags of apples and two bags of oranges for their Ronald MacDonald Family Room. Anyone who has had an extended stay in a children’s hospital has likely visited the Ronald MacDonald Family Room….a great refuge.

 

clevel clinic photo

Stuart Scott

 

 

I must confess that I am not an avid sports enthusiast. However when I learned of the passing of Stuart Scott I immediately wanted to share some thoughts.

espn_e_sscott_203x114Stuart’s war against cancer represents that battle so many of our young people fight each day. Stuart was diagnosed at the age of 41 years… which in case you didn’t already notice…is pretty young. His passing reminded me of why we do what we do..that is to help others fight the cancer war through supporting AYA CANCER RESEARCH and creating AWARENESS that CANCER is a disease that crosses all ages, social and ethnic groups…and needs to be stopped!

Good people die from cancer every day. Don’t you think it is time for us to find a CURE?

In closing I would like to share a quote from Stuart Scott:

“When you die, it does not mean that you lose to cancer.

You beat cancer by how you live,

why you live,

and in the manner in which you live.”

Have a Wonderful Holiday!

The Steven G AYA Cancer Research Fund would like to wish our supporters a wonderful Holiday Season. Take time to give thanks for all that is good in the world. Hug your family and show them you care.

Peace on Earth and Good Will Towards All Men and Women!

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SEE YOU IN 2015!

SAVE THE DATE: IT’S TIME TO TAKE A BITE OUT OF AYA CANCER!!!

HELLO EVERYONE, 

WE HOPE YOU WILL BE ABLE TO JOIN US ON

SATURDAY, JANUARY 24TH, 2015.

YOUR $40 TICKET

WILL BUY YOU AN EVENING OF

LIVE MUSIC, RAFFLES, SILENT AUCTIONS,

DINNER WITH WINE/BEER/SODA,

COFFEE AND GREEK DESSERTS,

AND AN OPPORTUNITY TO LEARN HOW TO DANCE GREEK!!!

GUEST SPEAKER WILL BE ROBERT PURGERT

(FORMER CANCER WARRIOR AND FUTURE PEDIATRIC ONCOLOGIST)

SO HELP US..

-SUPPORT OUR NEW WELLNESS PROGRAM-

 -SPA PACKAGES FOR YOUNG ADULT CANCER PATIENTS-

-AYA CANCER RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS-

fundraiserflyer2014-2015-SOCIAL SUPPORT FOR AYA CANCER WARRIORS-

SO…

WE HATE CANCER – BUT WE LOVE YOU!

 

FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT ANGIE:

ANGIE@FIGHTCONQUERCURE.COM

TO PURCHASE YOUR TICKETS ONLINE

VISIT OUR WEBSITE 

WWW.FIGHTCONQUERCURE.ORG

2014 Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Symposium

website-logo

 

 

PLEASE JOIN US!!!

SAVE THE DATE!!

OCTOBER 30-31, 2014

IRIS S. & BERT L. WOLSTEIN RESEARCH BUILDING

2103 CORNELL ROAD

CLEVELAND, OHIO 44106

 

The symposium is sponsored by the Angie Fowler Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Institute at University Hospitals Rainbow Babies & Children’s Hospital, UH Seidman Cancer, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, and the Oregon Health & Science University Knight Cancer Institute.

(REGISTRATION FORM aya symposium 2014)

The focus of this two-day symposium is advancing AYA-related research, increasing federal funding, and exploration of scientific, clinical and psychological considerations in the AYA population.

KEY NOTE SPEAKER:

Clifton Leaf, Deputy Manager Editor, Fortune Magazine and Author, The Truth In Small Doses – Why We’re Losing the War on Cancer – and How to Win It.

FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: AYASYM2014@UHHOSPITALS.ORG 

 

 

Support PAYA Cancer Research. By Robert Purgert (Young Cancer Warrior)

SeptePurgertmber is a special time of year that provides us with the unique opportunity to reflect on the impact that pediatric, adolescent, and young adult (PAYA) cancer has on all of us. As a society, there tends to be a larger focus on adult cancers, due to the volume and publicity associated with them. What PAYA cancer cases lack in volume, however, they more than make up for in the impact that they have on the lives of the individuals going through the struggle, as well as the lives of those around them. However, there are major improvements in PAYA research that can be made which might make all the difference going forward.
As a survivor of cancer myself, I know the reality all too well. I was diagnosed with AML Leukemia on October 2, 2008 – at the time I was 14 years old and had just started my freshman year of high school. As if trying to find new friends and fit in wasn’t hard enough, I had to deal with the stresses and uncertainty that came along with cancer as well. Life was certainly hard in these times, not only for myself, but also for my parents and others around me. My parents found ways to be at the hospital as much as possible while also balancing work and three other children; how they did it, I will never know. With the help and support of many, we got through our tough time; however, it is a situation that I would never wish on anyone, and that is why it is absolutely imperative that we continue to work towards increased funding and research for PAYA cancer.

I know the personal impact of PAYA cancer, but I also know the impact that PAYA research has on outcomes. The preferential treatment for me would have been a bone marrow transplant, however there was no match for me in the registry, and so I was forced to go ahead with strictly chemotherapy for my treatment. Since this is not the traditional or preferred method, my doctors offered that I try an extra experimental chemotherapy on top of the standard regiment. For me, the drugs were incredibly successful, and I was in remission after just one round of treatment – making me a firm believer in the power of research and experimental treatments.

Since PAYA cancer research is what helped me to survive, it has inspired me to take up the challenge of giving back to the cause, so that I can help others who might be in the unfortunate situation that I was once in. Thanks to the Steven G Foundation, I had the opportunity to do research on pediatric Medulloblastoma tumors in the lab of Dr. Alex Huang for the past two summers. It was truly an incredible experience, and to know that I was helping to give back to a cause that had given so much to me was very rewarding.

Now, I realize that not everyone out there has a personal tie with PAYA cancer, so you might be thinking, what’s my motivation? Why should I help the cause? Well, I very truly hope that no one reading this ever has to have any interaction with PAYA cancer. However, at this point, the best that we can do is hope. Why not guarantee that you will never have to be afraid of PAYA cancer? If we all work together, one day, we will be able to find a way to know cancer so well that it won’t be any more concerning than providing antibiotics for a common cold. That’s what I’m working toward. I work toward a day when parents will never have to live through the torment of watching their sick child pass away with nothing that can be done for them. I want to put an end to cancer. I hope that I can convince others to have the same goal.

A cure certainly isn’t going to happen overnight. The problem is complex – more complex than almost any other within the medical field. Also, PAYA is at a definite financial disadvantage. I mentioned earlier that adult cancers receive much more attention. Well, they also receive much more private and government funding for research. However, we should not be discouraged. There are still many factors on our side. The resilience of young people is something that can never be underestimated. Their hope in the future provides them with the attitude to persevere, even in the toughest circumstances. All that we need to do is to try our best to help with that fight. If the funding for PAYA cancer research could be brought up to be even half of what is used on adult cancers, the results could be life-changing – literally. Also, we cannot forget the importance of those who do the research. Without them, the goal can never be accomplished. This issue is too big to be solved by just one person; we need more researchers out there. To me, they are some of the most underappreciated heroes in our society. If we are able to make researchers the heroes of our society, then the best and brightest can be attracted to the field, thus helping the research to progress faster and further than ever.
Everyone is capable of making a difference. And it is definitely going to take all the help we can get if we want to put and end to PAYA cancers. I know I’m in, I hope that you will be too.