AYA CANCER

Summer is Gone!!!

This has been a busy summer!

Check out our photographs and see what we have been up to!!!

Childhood, Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Advocacy

Hard At Work in Washington DC

Our GO FUND ME Page on Facebook

has generated $1470 to support the distribution

of Wellness Bags to AYA Cancer Patients!

Thank you for your generosity!

 

The Angie Fowler AYA Cancer Institute granted us $7500 to increase the distribution of our Be Calm & Stay Strong Wellness gift bags. We look forward to reaching out to more AYA Cancer Medical Facilities to help and support young cancer patients during their treatment.

and last but not least…

 SAVE THE DATE!!!!

TAKE A BITE OUT OF CANCER FUNDRAISER

WILL BE

SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 2019!!!

HELP OUR Be Calm & Stay Strong Wellness Gift Bags

Hello folks –

We need your help. Due the popularity of our Wellness Gift Bags to AYA Cancer Patients – our funds are gone – we are now dipping into our research and education funds in order to bring hope and peace to newly diagnosed cancer patients.

If you donate $125 or more your name will be mentioned as the Wellness Bag donor! Don’t have that kind of money? Well get a group of friends together and make it happen. All you need to do is include the group members names in your message to me.

Remember – no gift is too small. Every dollar helps!!

We humbly thank you for your generosity.

And – here is the GoFundMe Link: https://www.gofundme.com/aya-cancer-patient-wellness-bags

Sincerely,

Angie

PS – PLEASE CONTACT ME IF YOU need more information about the BE CALM & STAY STRONG WELLNESS PROGRAM?

 

A Slippery Slope Indeed – Reflections on Survivorship

A Slippery Slope Indeed

by Dan Dean

 

Dan & Amelia

At this year’s CancerCon in April—a national cancer conference for adolescents andyoung adults—I co-presented with Amelia Baffa and Dr. Jennifer Giesel a talk on the mental health challenges many cancer patients and survivors experience and the ways to treat them—TheSlippery Slope of Survivorship. Both Ameila and Jenn support the adolescent and young adult cancer population at University Hospitals with psychosocial care. Our presentation reminded me of a time early in my survivorship experience, two or three months after treatment ended in 2003.Several well-meaning friends suggested I see a therapist to help make sense of this intense, life-altering experience. In my family, therapy wasn’t necessarily stigmatized, but no one in my family used it before either, aside maybe from consulting our family priest. And so I didn’t really consider it as a tool, unless things got really bad.
I ended up working through all of challenges in survivorship without any kind of professional help. I read tons of books, tried different approaches to living in my new normal, and consulted with close friends and family about how to make sense of things. I did a lot of the heavy lifting in the three years after treatment ended and largely came out okay. But I was fortunate in that my biggest supporters—my mom and brother (and dog Lady)—did as much as they could to support my study in self-care and recovery. Close friends augmented their support and I leaned heavily upon them to get through.
Looking back, I realize that without them, I could have developed depression or PTSD or any number of ailments of the mind. Back then, I didn’t know the terms and what they meant, but I can see how my support systems’ unwavering commitment to my recovery more or less kept me on track and clear of more serious issues.
Not everyone is as lucky as I was. What I learned from Amelia and Jenn is how professional therapy, the way an individual processes cancer, and a support system all work together; my recovery leaned toward the latter two. For other people, that metric can be different; some many not have access to a professional or a support system, left on their own to figure things out.
Now that I am 14 years out from my cancer experience, I recommend the value of professional psychosocial support, even though my path was more solitary and self-guided. There are plenty of opportunities to take the baton a therapist hands off to you and wrestle with those challenges on your own.
The two therapies I wished I had that could have sped along parts of my recovery were 1) diaphragmic breathing and 2) using a thought log. Diaphragmic breathing is a great deep breathing technique that slows the mind down and calms a person’s physiology so they can actually do therapeutic work. Thought logs are a step-by-step way to break down recurrent, unhelpful thought patterns by challenging the assumptions behind them. They’re helpful not just for cancer patients, but anyone dealing with day-to-day life stress. (to download both tools, visit www.m-powerment.org/cancercon)
There’s no exact method a person can use to find their way from the end of treatment and into their new normal. The keys, in my opinion, to make it through are keeping on the path toward the new normal—even though it may take you down many side streets you don’t necessarily want to settle on—and not going at it alone.
I certainly tried many approaches and there were some I discarded early on and others that have stayed with me well beyond those initial weeks and months into survivorship. But as I engaged in an extended time of trial and error with all of those therapies, it was the constant support of my family and close friends that kept me on the path and into the life I enjoy today.

 

Dan Dean is a 13-year survivor of stage IV non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Recognizing that few resources exist geared specifically toward men affected by cancer, Dan founded M Powerment to bring men of all ages together to lead amazing, impactful lives after a cancer diagnosis. A lifelong Cleveland sports fan, Dan also plays basketball, kayaks, hikes, and likes to go trail running.

Dan is also a SGAYA Board Member.

The website for the therapies presented at CancerCon 2017 is www.m-powerment.org/cancercon

Dan’s professional sites: www.dan-dean.com and www.m-powerment.org

Lou G., Pat T., & Angie

NE Ohio Cancer Warriors and Friends

Here are some photos from this year’s #CANCERCON 2017 event. Many thanks to our donors who support the Steven G AYA Cancer Research Fund. This year you sent six cancer survivors to Stupid Cancer’s CANCERCON conference in Denver! FIGHT! CONQUER!! CURE!!!

Alex & Jennifer A.

Bryan, Kim & Steven

Amelia, Angie, & Jennifer

ARE YOU COMING? WE NEED YOUR SUPPORT!

Hello Friends,

It is not in my nature to be bossy (ha) or demanding (double ha) but we are getting down to the wire. Our annual fundraiser TAKE A BITE OUT OF CANCER – will take place in  TWO WEEKS!!!

Uncle_Sam_(pointing_finger)

Please remember that your donations go directly to support local PAYA (pediatric, adolescent and young adult) cancer research at Case Medical School’s Huang PAYA Cancer Research Lab (www.huanglab.com),  and adolescent and young adult cancer patients and families right here is NE Ohio!!!

This year we distributed over 40 Wellness bags (which cost approximately $150 each) to YA Cancer Patients while in Treatment

We supplied fresh fruit and yogurt for Smoothie Day (bi-weekly) for young cancer patients while in treatment.

We supplied products for “BEAUTY DAY” which uplifted the morale of moms and patients by providing make-up and beauty hints, hand massages and manicures (I never thought massaging another’s hands could be so gratifying.)

We sent four young adult patients  from NE Ohio to CANCER CON 2015  in Colorado.

Also, just last week we sent a $250 check to support a dad and young son with cancer to the Annie Appleseed Project Conference. Annie Appleseed focuses on wellness through Integrative Oncology methods. You can visit their website at www.annieappleseedproject.org.

PLEASE HELP US WITH OUR MISSION

WE WILL NOT REST UNTIL THERE IS A CURE!!!

FIGHT! CONQUER! CURE!!!

take a BITE OUT OF CANCER!!

Saturday, January 23rd, 2016

event-logo (1)7 – 11 pm

23023 Center Ridge Road

Rocky River, Ohio 44116

Cost: $40

Can’t attend?

Well, feel free to make a cash donation or donate an auction item. Email me at info@fightconquercure.com for more info:)

EVIDENCED BASED CARE FOR AYA’S – AMELIA BAFFA

CONGRATULATIONS TO AMELIA BAFFA, CLINICAL ONCOLOGY NURSE, AYA PATIENT NAVIGATOR AT RAINBOW, BABIES & CHIMG_5577ILDRENS’ HOSPITAL AND SEIDMAN CANCER CENTER FOR HER CONTINUED EFFORTS TO IMPROVE CARE TO ADOLESCENTS AND YOUNG ADULT CANCER PATIENTS,

AMELIA RESEARCH POSTER WAS PRESENTED AT THE ACADEMY OF ONCOLOGY NURSE
NAVIGATOR CONFERENCE IN ATLANTA, GEORGIA LAST WEEK.

OVER 700 ONCOLOGY NURSES ATTENDED THE CONFERENCE, AND MOST OF THEM WERE WORKING VERY HARD TO RAISE AWARENESS OF THE NEEDS OF AYA CANCER PATIENTS DURING AND AFTER TREATMENTS.

THANK YOU AMELIA FOR YOUR DEDICATED WORK!!!

FIGHT! CONQUER! CURE!!!

do you know my rights

Navigating and Advocating for Yourself at School, College, and the Workplace: A Three Part Series

This three part series for Teens, Young Adults and their Caregivers.

SESSION ONE is on RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES (learn about legal rights and accommodations) and will take place on October 6th, 2015.

SESSION TWO is on THE ART OF ADVOCACY: identifying strategies for building positive relationships with teachers and employers. Session two will take place on October 20th, 2015.

SESSION THREE is on GETTING IT TOGETHER: creating a management system to manage your time and organize your documents. Session Three will take place on November 3rd, 2015.

WHERE:

Rainbow, Babies & Children’s Hospital: Pediatric Amphitheatre (RBC 1231)

11100 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OHio 44016

TIME:

6 PM – 7:30 PM

SPEAKER:

Katie Wetherbee MA.Ed.

Katie is an experienced educational consultant who specializes in teens and young adults with cancer and other chronic medical issues.

REGISTRATION REQUIRED

PLEASE CONTACT AMELIA BAFFA @ 216-844-1969
THIS EVENT IS FREE OF CHARGE

THE EVENT WAS MADE POSSIBLE BY THE STEVEN G. AYA CANCER RESEARCH FUND

Please click on the link below for the Program Flyer

 

Navigating and ADV_Oct2015 AYA

ADA accessibility

GO FOR THE GOLD – CHILDHOOD CANCER AWARENESS MONTH

FRIENDS

PLEASE REMEMBER THAT SEPTEMBER IS CHILDHOOD CANCER AWARENESS MONTH. 

PLEASE REMEMBER THAT CHILDHOOD CANCER SURVIVORS BECOME ADOLESCENTS AND YOUNG ADULTS WITH SECONDARY ILLNESSES 

PLEASE REMEMBER THAT EACH DAY PARENTS ARE MOURNING THE LOSS OF THEIR CHILD AS A RESULT OF CANCER.

PLEASE REMEMBER THAT PEDIATRIC CANCER IS THE #1 DISEASE RELATED KILLER OF KIDS IN THE UNITED STATES.

KNOW THAT THE NIH (NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF HEALTH – WHERE YOUR TAX DOLLARS GO) GETS $30 BILLION FOR RESEARCH ANNUALLY, YET CHILDHOOD CANCER RESEARCH GETS LESS THAN $200 MILLION. THE DEADLIEST CHILDHOOD CANCERS GET LITTLE OR NO FUNDING.

IT’S NOT A MATTER OF MORE MONEY, IT’S A MATTER OF PRIORITIES.ribbon

 

 

 

 

WE MUST MAKE CHILDHOOD CANCER RESEARCH A NATIONAL PRIORITY AND GIVE KIDS PEDIATRIC CURES, TREATMENTS, PROTOCOLS AND HOPE!!!

fight! conquer! CURE!!!